Friends of North Bruny Launch Dennes Point Heritage Trail

On the 20th of October 2018, Friends of North Bruny officially opened the Dennes Point Heritage Trail Interpretation Panels and Website, for Friends of North Bruny. This is a fantastic new short walk on the very northern-most tip of Bruny Island, a site of incredible heritage significance – it was here that some of the very first encounters between Europeans and Tasmanian’s first people occurred, with visits by the French on D’Entrecasteaux’s and Baudin’s expeditions.They made beautiful and haunting pictures of the people, animals, plants and landscapes they encountered, many of which have been stunningly reproduced on fourteen panels installed on the Heritage Trail.

The panels also represent the subsequent history of the site, including early settlement by Europeans and their commercial endeavours and marine policing efforts. These included farming and whaling, but also plenty of frivolity with events like fetes and regattas. Other aspects of the site that you can learn about as you follow the trail include its geology and natural history, and the somewhat fraught history of transport to the Island.

The Dennes Point Heritage Trail also provides access to the beautiful northern tip of Bruny Island, Tasmania, where you can enjoy stunning views across the waters where the D’Entrecasteaux Channel, Derwent Estuary and Storm Bay all converge. The walk can be completed by strolling along Jetty Beach (watch out for quolls!), or perhaps a swim?

Bright South is proud to have supported the development of the Heritage Trail, including coordinating production of the panels and production of Friends of North Bruny’s website. Take a look – you can even do a virtual tour of the site or download the panel audios to listen as you walk. Perfect for those who spend so long in front of books and screens their eyes need a rest! Jump straight to the Heritage Trail welcome page.

Review: Dominique Hecq’s ‘Hush: A Fugue’

Hush: A Fugue is a beautiful, sad, quiet collection, everything it’s title suggests. Cordite have just published my review of this work by Dominique Hecq, and you’ll find it here.

For me, Hush really evokes the feel of Melbourne – its culture, its weather, the city itself. Yet it is also a kind of feminine odyssey into and through loss and mourning. One aspect of that journey that I found particularly interesting was the way that it nudges against the limits of our language. And by that I mean the ordinary Australian English we speak here, in this country. When I was very small I understood another language (Czech), and maybe that was what made me feel, from a very early age, as though things were missing from everyday life and language – because I lost that language as I grew up into an entirely Anglophone world. Later, when I became a French speaker, I rediscovered how there are things that can only be said, it seems, in one language, and not any other. These are the sorts of things Hecq also exposes– in Hush, there are occasions when she slips into her own mother tongue, French, to express things. And it is not just for the words or ideas that she uses it, but also for the cadence or colour of the language, aspects which are like a whole other language in their own right.

I would direct you to a link, but it seems you’ll find Hush easily enough if you look. Here are the essential details:

Dominique Hecq, Hush: A Fugue, UWA Publishing, 2017.