Friends of North Bruny Launch Dennes Point Heritage Trail

On the 20th of October 2018, Friends of North Bruny officially opened the Dennes Point Heritage Trail Interpretation Panels and Website, for Friends of North Bruny. This is a fantastic new short walk on the very northern-most tip of Bruny Island, a site of incredible heritage significance – it was here that some of the very first encounters between Europeans and Tasmanian’s first people occurred, with visits by the French on D’Entrecasteaux’s and Baudin’s expeditions.They made beautiful and haunting pictures of the people, animals, plants and landscapes they encountered, many of which have been stunningly reproduced on fourteen panels installed on the Heritage Trail.

The panels also represent the subsequent history of the site, including early settlement by Europeans and their commercial endeavours and marine policing efforts. These included farming and whaling, but also plenty of frivolity with events like fetes and regattas. Other aspects of the site that you can learn about as you follow the trail include its geology and natural history, and the somewhat fraught history of transport to the Island.

The Dennes Point Heritage Trail also provides access to the beautiful northern tip of Bruny Island, Tasmania, where you can enjoy stunning views across the waters where the D’Entrecasteaux Channel, Derwent Estuary and Storm Bay all converge. The walk can be completed by strolling along Jetty Beach (watch out for quolls!), or perhaps a swim?

Bright South is proud to have supported the development of the Heritage Trail, including coordinating production of the panels and production of Friends of North Bruny’s website. Take a look – you can even do a virtual tour of the site or download the panel audios to listen as you walk. Perfect for those who spend so long in front of books and screens their eyes need a rest! Jump straight to the Heritage Trail welcome page.

Friends of North Bruny Website

Friends of North Bruny represents the community on North Bruny Island, Tasmania (everything north of the Neck). It facilitates cooperation between North Bruny’s communities, Kingborough Council, State and Commonwealth Government departments and others, focusing on issues like safety, public access and amenities and safeguarding environmental and heritage values. In action since at least 2014, FONB now has a website, which Bright South is pleased to have designed and constructed. It’s full of useful information and links. Take a look:

www.friendsofnorthbruny.org.au

Anne Morgan’s Website Makeover

Anne Morgan is an amazing poet! She’s also a super active member of Tasmania’s writing community, coordinating the Facebook page ‘Celebrate Tasmanian Books and Writing’, and you can often catch her reading her work about the state. If you get the chance to hear her, go!

Anne also knows just the way to catch the attention of children and has written several works for littlies, which are subtle, sensitive, ethical and amusing. Her poetic touch can be felt in titles like ‘The Moonlight Bird and the Grolken’, ‘The Sky Dreamer’, which has been translated into French and German, and the wonderful ‘Captain Clawbeak’ series. And then there is ‘The Smallest Carbon Footprint in the Land and Other Ecotales’ – joint winner (with Gay McKinnon) of the national Environmental Children’s Book of the Year 2014 (Junior Fiction), and so it should be, because girls get to have amazing adventures as well as boys in this great book.

To help you find out more about Anne’s writing, access some great teaching resources, and discover some of Anne’s poetry, Bright South has given Anne’s website a makeover. The lovely new site features header photography (by Bright South), which celebrates Anne’s heartland-home on Bruny Island, Tasmania. Go and take a look at the new look site: www.annemorgan.com.au

Pete Hay Poet Website

Of one of Tasmania’s greatest poets, of Pete Hay, Rachel Edwards wrote: “no one else takes the temperature of this island like Hay, and no one else uses Tasmania as such an effective prism through which to consider human nature” (The Australian, September 18, 2016 – See a copy on Rachel’s blog).

Pete is a wonderful poet but so much more as well. In a tempestuous isle, he has long been a voice for temperance, conciliation and fairness, while never losing sight of the wonder, majesty and intrinsic value of Tasmania’s, and the world’s natural environment. He speaks up for those whose voices are so often lost in political and media discourse – traditional foresters and farmers with a love for, and deep understanding of the ecology of the lands they and their forebears have long worked, often so much more sensitively and ethically than the huge corporations which now run so much of the Global economy.

Pete speaks for ordinary Tasmanian families, wherein there are so often rifts between siblings, cousins, and generations – between those who consider themselves to be on one side of the political divide, and those on the other – between those who want reliable work and to provide for their families, and those who want above all to protect what makes Tasmania unique and special.

Over the years Pete has trodden the halls of government, been an academic and a lecturer, and steadily contributed to scholarly debate; but he has also written innumerable essays. They have appeared in wilderness calendars, art exhibition catalogues, forwards in books, opinion pieces in the newspaper, everywhere! For this reason I believe that Pete has had an incredibly profound influence on Tasmanian thought and writing. Barely a novel has appeared in Tasmania that doesn’t seem to me to bear the trace of Pete’s thoughts, his temperament, his ethics, or his generous and sensitive celebration of, and belief in Australia’s unique island state and her people.

It is for all of these reasons that Bright South offered to construct a website for Pete – because his work deserves to be still better known, his influence acknowledged, and to continue spread the word about his work and make it more accessible. The site is now live – check it out, it’s beautiful! And proudly constructed by Bright South. It features photos by both Bright South and Pete, as well as many other fabulous contributors: www.petehaywriter.wordpress.com

For a self-professed Luddite, Pete has been an enthusiastic and courageous supporter of this endeavour and, yes, he has published blog posts all by himself! He’s even got right behind the Facebook thing too – you can follow him there to keep completely up to date: www.facebook.com/petehaywriter/

An image of Pete Hay (notepad in hand) and Ollie, on the seashore.
Pete and Ollie